CD200

Gene Summary

Gene:CD200; CD200 molecule
Aliases: MRC, MOX1, MOX2, OX-2
Location:3q13.2
Summary:The protein encoded by this gene is a type-1 membrane glycoprotein, which contains two immunoglobulin domains, and thus belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Studies of the related genes in mouse and rat suggest that this gene may regulate myeloid cell activity and delivers an inhibitory signal for the macrophage lineage in diverse tissues. Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants that encode different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
Databases:VEGA, OMIM, HGNC, Ensembl, GeneCard, Gene
Protein:OX-2 membrane glycoprotein
Source:NCBIAccessed: 06 August, 2015

Ontology:

What does this gene/protein do?
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Cancer Overview

Research Indicators

Publications Per Year (1990-2015)
Graph generated 06 August 2015 using data from PubMed using criteria.

Literature Analysis

Mouse over the terms for more detail; many indicate links which you can click for dedicated pages about the topic.

Tag cloud generated 06 August, 2015 using data from PubMed, MeSH and CancerIndex

Specific Cancers (5)

Data table showing topics related to specific cancers and associated disorders. Scope includes mutations and abnormal protein expression.

Note: list is not exhaustive. Number of papers are based on searches of PubMed (click on topic title for arbitrary criteria used).

Latest Publications: CD200 (cancer-related)

Williams LN, Marjavaara L, Knowels GM, et al.
dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015; 112(19):E2457-66 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 12/11/2015 Related Publications
Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy.

Ren X, Wu X, Hillier SG, et al.
Local estrogen metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer suggests novel targets for therapy.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2015; 150:54-63 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 12/11/2015 Related Publications
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) accounts for about 90% of malignant ovarian tumors, and estrogen is often implicated in disease progression. We therefore compared the potential for gating of estrogen action via pre-receptor metabolism in normal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), EOC and selected EOC cell lines (SKOV3 and PEO1). Steroid sulphatase (STS), estrogen sulfotransferase (EST), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases 2 (17BHSD2) and 5 (17BHSD5) mRNAs, proteins and enzymatic activities were all detectable in primary cell cultures of OSE and EOC, whereas aromatase and 17BHSD1 expression was negligible. qRT-PCR assay on total mRNA revealed significantly higher EST mRNA expression in OSE compared to EOC (P<0.05). Radioenzymatic measurements confirmed reduced sulfoconjugation (neutralization) of free estrogen in EOC relative to OSE. OSE cells were more effective at converting free [(3)H]-E1 to [(3)H]-E1S or [(3)H]-E2S, while EOC cell lines mainly converted [(3)H]-E1 to [(3)H]-E2 with minimal formation of [(3)H]-E1S or [(3)H]-E2S. IL1α treatment suppressed EST (P<0.01) and 17BHSD2 (P<0.001) mRNA levels in OSE and stimulated STS mRNA levels (P<0.001) in cancer (SKOV3) cells. These results show that estrogen is differentially metabolized in OSE and EOC cells, with E2 'activation' from conjugated estrogen predominating in EOC. Inflammatory cytokines may further augment the local production of E2 by stimulating STS and suppressing EST. We conclude that local estrogen metabolism may be a target for EOC treatment.

Geng H, Hurtz C, Lenz KB, et al.
Self-enforcing feedback activation between BCL6 and pre-B cell receptor signaling defines a distinct subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Cancer Cell. 2015; 27(3):409-25 [PubMed] Related Publications
Studying 830 pre-B ALL cases from four clinical trials, we found that human ALL can be divided into two fundamentally distinct subtypes based on pre-BCR function. While absent in the majority of ALL cases, tonic pre-BCR signaling was found in 112 cases (13.5%). In these cases, tonic pre-BCR signaling induced activation of BCL6, which in turn increased pre-BCR signaling output at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, inhibition of pre-BCR-related tyrosine kinases reduced constitutive BCL6 expression and selectively killed patient-derived pre-BCR(+) ALL cells. These findings identify a genetically and phenotypically distinct subset of human ALL that critically depends on tonic pre-BCR signaling. In vivo treatment studies suggested that pre-BCR tyrosine kinase inhibitors are useful for the treatment of patients with pre-BCR(+) ALL.

Verbiest T, Bouffler S, Nutt SL, Badie C
PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML.
Carcinogenesis. 2015; 36(4):413-9 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 12/11/2015 Related Publications
The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the -14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies.

Gaboriau DC, Rowling PJ, Morrison CG, Itzhaki LS
Protein stability versus function: effects of destabilizing missense mutations on BRCA1 DNA repair activity.
Biochem J. 2015; 466(3):613-24 [PubMed] Related Publications
Mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 (breast cancer early-onset 1) are associated with increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 is a large protein of 1863 residues with two small structured domains at its termini: a RING domain at the N-terminus and a BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus domain) repeat domain at the C-terminus. Previously, we quantified the effects of missense mutations on the thermodynamic stability of the BRCT domains, and we showed that many are so destabilizing that the folded functional state is drastically depopulated at physiological temperature. In the present study, we ask whether and how reduced thermodynamic stability of the isolated BRCT mutants translates into loss of function of the full-length protein in the cell. We assessed the effects of missense mutants on different stages of BRCA1-mediated DNA repair by homologous recombination using chicken lymphoblastoid DT40 cells as a model system. We found that all of the mutations, regardless of how profound their destabilizing effects, retained some DNA repair activity and thereby partially rescued the chicken BRCA1 knockout. By contrast, the mutation R1699L, which disrupts the binding of phosphorylated proteins (but which is not destabilizing), was completely inactive. It is likely that both protein context (location of the BRCT domains at the C-terminus of the large BRCA1 protein) and cellular environment (binding partners, molecular chaperones) buffer these destabilizing effects such that at least some mutant protein is able to adopt the folded functional state.

Hohenstein P, Pritchard-Jones K, Charlton J
The yin and yang of kidney development and Wilms' tumors.
Genes Dev. 2015; 29(5):467-82 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/09/2015 Related Publications
Wilms' tumor, or nephroblastoma, is the most common pediatric renal cancer. The tumors morphologically resemble embryonic kidneys with a disrupted architecture and are associated with undifferentiated metanephric precursors. Here, we discuss genetic and epigenetic findings in Wilms' tumor in the context of renal development. Many of the genes implicated in Wilms' tumorigenesis are involved in the control of nephron progenitors or the microRNA (miRNA) processing pathway. Whereas the first group of genes has been extensively studied in normal development, the second finding suggests important roles for miRNAs in general-and specific miRNAs in particular-in normal kidney development that still await further analysis. The recent identification of Wilms' tumor cancer stem cells could provide a framework to integrate these pathways and translate them into new or improved therapeutic interventions.

McFarlane M, MacDonald AI, Stevenson A, Graham SV
Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein Expression Is Controlled by the Cellular Splicing Factor SRSF2 (SC35).
J Virol. 2015; 89(10):5276-87 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 15/11/2015 Related Publications
UNLABELLED: High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) cause anogenital cancers, including cervical cancer, and head and neck cancers. Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is the most prevalent HR-HPV. HPV oncogenesis is driven by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, which are expressed through alternative splicing of a polycistronic RNA to yield four major splice isoforms (E6 full length, E6*I, E6*II, E6*X). The production of multiple mRNA isoforms from a single gene is controlled by serine/arginine-rich splicing factors (SRSFs), and HPV16 infection induces overexpression of a subset of these, SRSFs 1, 2, and 3. In this study, we examined whether these proteins could control HPV16 oncoprotein expression. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion experiments revealed that SRSF1 did not affect oncoprotein RNA levels. While SRSF3 knockdown caused some reduction in E6E7 expression, depletion of SRSF2 resulted in a significant loss of E6E7 RNAs, resulting in reduced levels of the E6-regulated p53 proteins and E7 oncoprotein itself. SRSF2 contributed to the tumor phenotype of HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells, as its depletion resulted in decreased cell proliferation, reduced colony formation, and increased apoptosis. SRSF2 did not affect transcription from the P97 promoter that controls viral oncoprotein expression. Rather, RNA decay experiments showed that SRSF2 is required to maintain stability of E6E7 mRNAs. These data show that SRSF2 is a key regulator of HPV16 oncoprotein expression and cervical tumor maintenance.
IMPORTANCE: Expression of the HPV16 oncoproteins E7 and E6 drives HPV-associated tumor formation. Although increased transcription may yield increased levels of E6E7 mRNAs, it is known that the RNAs can have increased stability upon integration into the host genome. SR splicing factors (SRSFs) control splicing but can also control other events in the RNA life cycle, including RNA stability. Previously, we demonstrated increased levels of SRSFs 1, 2, and 3 during cervical tumor progression. Now we show that SRSF2 is required for expression of E6E7 mRNAs in cervical tumor but not nontumor cells and may act by inhibiting their decay. SRSF2 depletion in W12 tumor cells resulted in increased apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and decreased colony formation, suggesting that SRSF2 has oncogenic functions in cervical tumor progression. SRSF function can be targeted by known drugs that inhibit SRSF phosphorylation, suggesting a possible new avenue in abrogating HPV oncoprotein activity.

Mort RL, Jackson IJ, Patton EE
The melanocyte lineage in development and disease.
Development. 2015; 142(4):620-32 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 15/11/2015 Related Publications
Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma.

Buckland G, Travier N, Huerta JM, et al.
Healthy lifestyle index and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in the EPIC cohort study.
Int J Cancer. 2015; 137(3):598-606 [PubMed] Related Publications
Several modifiable lifestyle factors, including smoking, alcohol, certain dietary factors and weight are independently associated with gastric cancer (GC); however, their combined impact on GC risk is unknown. We constructed a healthy lifestyle index to investigate the joint influence of these behaviors on GC risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The analysis included 461,550 participants (662 first incident GC cases) with a mean follow-up of 11.4 years. A healthy lifestyle index was constructed, assigning 1 point for each healthy behavior related to smoking status, alcohol consumption and diet quality (represented by the Mediterranean diet) for assessing overall GC and also body mass index for cardia GC and 0 points otherwise. Risk of GC was calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models while adjusting for relevant confounders. The highest versus lowest score in the healthy lifestyle index was associated with a significant lower risk of GC, by 51% overall (HR 0.49 95% CI 0.35, 0.70), by 77% for cardia GC (HR 0.23 95% CI 0.08, 0.68) and by 47% for noncardia GC (HR 0.53 (95% CI 0.32, 0.87), p-trends<0.001. Population attributable risk calculations showed that 18.8% of all GC and 62.4% of cardia GC cases could have been prevented if participants in this population had followed the healthy lifestyle behaviors of this index. Adopting several healthy lifestyle behaviors including not smoking, limiting alcohol consumption, eating a healthy diet and maintaining a normal weight is associated with a large decreased risk of GC.

Shaham L, Vendramini E, Ge Y, et al.
MicroRNA-486-5p is an erythroid oncomiR of the myeloid leukemias of Down syndrome.
Blood. 2015; 125(8):1292-301 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 19/02/2016 Related Publications
Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk for acute myeloid leukemias (ML-DS) characterized by mixed megakaryocytic and erythroid phenotype and by acquired mutations in the GATA1 gene resulting in a short GATA1s isoform. The chromosome 21 microRNA (miR)-125b cluster has been previously shown to cooperate with GATA1s in transformation of fetal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we report that the expression of miR-486-5p is increased in ML-DS compared with non-DS acute megakaryocytic leukemias (AMKLs). miR-486-5p is regulated by GATA1 and GATA1s that bind to the promoter of its host gene ANK1. miR-486-5p is highly expressed in mouse erythroid precursors and knockdown (KD) in ML-DS cells reduced their erythroid phenotype. Ectopic expression and KD of miR-486-5p in primary fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors demonstrated that miR-486-5p cooperates with Gata1s to enhance their self renewal. Consistent with its activation of AKT, overexpression and KD experiments showed its importance for growth and survival of human leukemic cells. Thus, miR-486-5p cooperates with GATA1s in supporting the growth and survival, and the aberrant erythroid phenotype of the megakaryocytic leukemias of DS.

Jones AV, Ward D, Lyon M, et al.
Evaluation of methods to detect CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.
Leuk Res. 2015; 39(1):82-7 [PubMed] Related Publications
The recent discovery of somatically acquired CALR mutations in a substantial proportion of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms has provided a new marker of clonal disease, advancing both diagnosis and prognosis in these previously difficult to characterise disorders. The mutations, which can be challenging to detect on a routine basis, are heterogeneous insertions/deletions (indels) in exon 9 with mutant allele burden that vary substantially between patients. We evaluated four genetic screening methods for their ability to detect a series of different CALR mutations; Sanger sequencing, fragment analysis PCR, high resolution melt (HRM) and targeted next generation sequencing (NGS). The limit of detection (LoD) of each assay was tested using serial dilution series made with DNA from CALR positive sample DNA and a cell line, MARIMO, found to carry a heterozygous 61 nucleotide CALR deletion. All methods were capable of detecting each mutation; HRM and fragment analysis PCR were better at detecting low mutation levels compared to Sanger sequencing but targeted NGS had the lowest LoD at a 1% mutation burden.

Palles C, Chegwidden L, Li X, et al.
Polymorphisms near TBX5 and GDF7 are associated with increased risk for Barrett's esophagus.
Gastroenterology. 2015; 148(2):367-78 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 19/02/2016 Related Publications
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Barrett's esophagus (BE) increases the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We found the risk to be BE has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 (within the HLA region) and on 16q23, where the closest protein-coding gene is FOXF1. Subsequently, the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) identified risk loci for BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma near CRTC1 and BARX1, and within 100 kb of FOXP1. We aimed to identify further SNPs that increased BE risk and to validate previously reported associations.
METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with BE and further analyzed promising variants identified by BEACON by genotyping 10,158 patients with BE and 21,062 controls.
RESULTS: We identified 2 SNPs not previously associated with BE: rs3072 (2p24.1; odds ratio [OR] = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.09-1.18; P = 1.8 × 10(-11)) and rs2701108 (12q24.21; OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.86-0.93; P = 7.5 × 10(-9)). The closest protein-coding genes were respectively GDF7 (rs3072), which encodes a ligand in the bone morphogenetic protein pathway, and TBX5 (rs2701108), which encodes a transcription factor that regulates esophageal and cardiac development. Our data also supported in BE cases 3 risk SNPs identified by BEACON (rs2687201, rs11789015, and rs10423674). Meta-analysis of all data identified another SNP associated with BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma: rs3784262, within ALDH1A2 (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.87-0.93; P = 3.72 × 10(-9)).
CONCLUSIONS: We identified 2 loci associated with risk of BE and provided data to support a further locus. The genes we found to be associated with risk for BE encode transcription factors involved in thoracic, diaphragmatic, and esophageal development or proteins involved in the inflammatory response.

Yizhak K, Gaude E, Le Dévédec S, et al.
Phenotype-based cell-specific metabolic modeling reveals metabolic liabilities of cancer.
Elife. 2014; 3 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 19/02/2016 Related Publications
Utilizing molecular data to derive functional physiological models tailored for specific cancer cells can facilitate the use of individually tailored therapies. To this end we present an approach termed PRIME for generating cell-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) based on molecular and phenotypic data. We build >280 models of normal and cancer cell-lines that successfully predict metabolic phenotypes in an individual manner. We utilize this set of cell-specific models to predict drug targets that selectively inhibit cancerous but not normal cell proliferation. The top predicted target, MLYCD, is experimentally validated and the metabolic effects of MLYCD depletion investigated. Furthermore, we tested cell-specific predicted responses to the inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and successfully inferred the prognosis of cancer patients based on their PRIME-derived individual GSMMs. These results lay a computational basis and a counterpart experimental proof of concept for future personalized metabolic modeling applications, enhancing the search for novel selective anticancer therapies.

Durgan J, Tao G, Walters MS, et al.
SOS1 and Ras regulate epithelial tight junction formation in the human airway through EMP1.
EMBO Rep. 2015; 16(1):87-96 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/01/2016 Related Publications
The human airway is lined with respiratory epithelial cells, which create a critical barrier through the formation of apical tight junctions. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this process, an RNAi screen for guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) was performed in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). We report that SOS1, acting through the Ras/MEK/ERK pathway, is essential for tight junction formation. Global microarray analysis identifies epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), an integral tetraspan membrane protein, as a major transcriptional target. EMP1 is indispensable for tight junction formation and function in 16HBE cells and in a human airway basal progenitor-like cell line (BCi-NS1.1). Furthermore, EMP1 is significantly downregulated in human lung cancers. Together, these data identify important roles for SOS1/Ras and EMP1 in tight junction assembly during airway morphogenesis.

Pan XD, Yang ZP, Tang QL, et al.
Expression and function of GSTA1 in lung cancer cells.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2014; 15(20):8631-5 [PubMed] Related Publications
Glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) appears to be primarily involved in detoxification processes, but possible roles in lung cancer remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and function of GSTA1 in lung cancer cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to assess expression in cancer cell lines and the normal lung cells, then verify the A549 cells line with stable overexpression. Localization of GSTA1 proteins was assessed by cytoimmunofluorescence. Three double-strand DNA oligoRNAs (SiRNAs) were synthesized prior to being transfected into A549 cells with Lipofectamine 2000, and then the most efficient SiRNA was selected. Expression of the GSTA1 gene in the transfected cells was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The viability of the transfected cells were assessed by MTT. Results showed that the mRNA and protein expression of A549 cancer cells was higher than in MRC-5 normal cells. Cytoimmunofluorescence demonstrated GSTA1 localization in the cell cytoplasm and/or membranes. Transfection into A549 cells demonstrated that down-regulated expression could inhibit cell viability. Our data indicated that GSTA1 expression may be a target molecule in early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

Köbel M, Madore J, Ramus SJ, et al.
Evidence for a time-dependent association between FOLR1 expression and survival from ovarian carcinoma: implications for clinical testing. An Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis consortium study.
Br J Cancer. 2014; 111(12):2297-307 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 09/12/2015 Related Publications
BACKGROUND: Folate receptor 1 (FOLR1) is expressed in the majority of ovarian carcinomas (OvCa), making it an attractive target for therapy. However, clinical trials testing anti-FOLR1 therapies in OvCa show mixed results and require better understanding of the prognostic relevance of FOLR1 expression. We conducted a large study evaluating FOLR1 expression with survival in different histological types of OvCa.
METHODS: Tissue microarrays composed of tumour samples from 2801 patients in the Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis (OTTA) consortium were assessed for FOLR1 expression by centralised immunohistochemistry. We estimated associations for overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival using adjusted Cox regression models. High-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSC) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were evaluated independently for association between FOLR1 mRNA upregulation and survival.
RESULTS: FOLR1 expression ranged from 76% in HGSC to 11% in mucinous carcinomas in OTTA. For HGSC, the association between FOLR1 expression and OS changed significantly during the years following diagnosis in OTTA (Pinteraction=0.01, N=1422) and TCGA (Pinteraction=0.01, N=485). In OTTA, particularly for FIGO stage I/II tumours, patients with FOLR1-positive HGSC showed increased OS during the first 2 years only (hazard ratio=0.44, 95% confidence interval=0.20-0.96) and patients with FOLR1-positive clear cell carcinomas (CCC) showed decreased PFS independent of follow-up time (HR=1.89, 95% CI=1.10-3.25, N=259). In TCGA, FOLR1 mRNA upregulation in HGSC was also associated with increased OS during the first 2 years following diagnosis irrespective of tumour stage (HR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.94).
CONCLUSIONS: FOLR1-positive HGSC tumours were associated with an increased OS in the first 2 years following diagnosis. Patients with FOLR1-negative, poor prognosis HGSC would be unlikely to benefit from anti-FOLR1 therapies. In contrast, a decreased PFS interval was observed for FOLR1-positive CCC. The clinical efficacy of FOLR1-targeted interventions should therefore be evaluated according to histology, stage and time following diagnosis.


Smoking and long-term risk of type 2 diabetes: the EPIC-InterAct study in European populations.
Diabetes Care. 2014; 37(12):3164-71 [PubMed] Related Publications
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between smoking and incident type 2 diabetes, accounting for a large number of potential confounding factors, and to explore potential effect modifiers and intermediate factors.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct is a prospective case-cohort study within eight European countries, including 12,403 cases of incident type 2 diabetes and a random subcohort of 16,835 individuals. After exclusion of individuals with missing data, the analyses included 10,327 cases and 13,863 subcohort individuals. Smoking status was used (never, former, current), with never smokers as the reference. Country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models and random-effects meta-analysis were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for type 2 diabetes.
RESULTS: In men, the HRs (95% CI) of type 2 diabetes were 1.40 (1.26, 1.55) for former smokers and 1.43 (1.27, 1.61) for current smokers, independent of age, education, center, physical activity, and alcohol, coffee, and meat consumption. In women, associations were weaker, with HRs (95% CI) of 1.18 (1.07, 1.30) and 1.13 (1.03, 1.25) for former and current smokers, respectively. There was some evidence of effect modification by BMI. The association tended to be slightly stronger in normal weight men compared with those with overall adiposity.
CONCLUSIONS: Former and current smoking was associated with a higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with never smoking in men and women, independent of educational level, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and diet. Smoking may be regarded as a modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and smoking cessation should be encouraged for diabetes prevention.

Buas MF, Levine DM, Makar KW, et al.
Integrative post-genome-wide association analysis of CDKN2A and TP53 SNPs and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Carcinogenesis. 2014; 35(12):2740-7 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) in Western countries has increased markedly in recent decades. Although several risk factors have been identified for EA and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE), including reflux, Caucasian race, male gender, obesity, and smoking, less is known about the role of inherited genetic variation. Frequent somatic mutations in the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and TP53 were recently reported in EA tumors, while somatic alterations at 9p (CDKN2A) and 17p (TP53) have been implicated as predictors of progression from BE to EA. Motivated by these findings, we used data from a genome-wide association study of 2515 EA cases and 3207 controls to analyze 37 germline single nucleotide polymorphisms at the CDKN2A and TP53 loci. Three CDKN2A polymorphisms were nominally associated (P < 0.05) with reduced risk of EA: rs2518720 C>T [intronic, odds ratio 0.90, P = 0.0121, q = 0.3059], rs3088440 G>A (3'UTR, odds ratio 0.84, P = 0.0186, q = 0.3059), and rs4074785 C>T (intronic, odds ratio 0.85, P = 0.0248, q = 0.3059). None of the TP53 single nucleotide polymorphisms reached nominal significance. Two of the CDKN2A variants identified were also associated with reduced risk of progression from BE to EA, when assessed in a prospective cohort of 408 BE patients: rs2518720 (hazard ratio 0.57, P = 0.0095, q = 0.0285) and rs3088440 (hazard ratio 0.34, P = 0.0368, q = 0.0552). In vitro functional studies of rs3088440, a single nucleotide polymorphism located in the seed sequence of a predicted miR-663b binding site, suggested a mechanism whereby the G>A substitution may attenuate miR-663b-mediated repression of the CDKN2A transcript. This study provides the first evidence that germline variation at the CDKN2A locus may influence EA susceptibility.

Skibola CF, Berndt SI, Vijai J, et al.
Genome-wide association study identifies five susceptibility loci for follicular lymphoma outside the HLA region.
Am J Hum Genet. 2014; 95(4):462-71 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of follicular lymphoma (FL) have previously identified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants. To identify additional FL susceptibility loci, we conducted a large-scale two-stage GWAS in 4,523 case subjects and 13,344 control subjects of European ancestry. Five non-HLA loci were associated with FL risk: 11q23.3 (rs4938573, p = 5.79 × 10(-20)) near CXCR5; 11q24.3 (rs4937362, p = 6.76 × 10(-11)) near ETS1; 3q28 (rs6444305, p = 1.10 × 10(-10)) in LPP; 18q21.33 (rs17749561, p = 8.28 × 10(-10)) near BCL2; and 8q24.21 (rs13254990, p = 1.06 × 10(-8)) near PVT1. In an analysis of the HLA region, we identified four linked HLA-DRβ1 multiallelic amino acids at positions 11, 13, 28, and 30 that were associated with FL risk (pomnibus = 4.20 × 10(-67) to 2.67 × 10(-70)). Additional independent signals included rs17203612 in HLA class II (odds ratio [OR(per-allele)] = 1.44; p = 4.59 × 10(-16)) and rs3130437 in HLA class I (OR(per-allele) = 1.23; p = 8.23 × 10(-9)). Our findings further expand the number of loci associated with FL and provide evidence that multiple common variants outside the HLA region make a significant contribution to FL risk.

Perry JR, Day F, Elks CE, et al.
Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.
Nature. 2014; 514(7520):92-7 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.

Kachroo N, Warren AY, Gnanapragasam VJ
Multi-transcript profiling in archival diagnostic prostate cancer needle biopsies to evaluate biomarkers in non-surgically treated men.
BMC Cancer. 2014; 14:673 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
BACKGROUND: Most biomarkers in prostate cancer have only been evaluated in surgical cohorts. The value of these biomarkers in a different therapy context remains unclear. Our objective was to test a panel of surgical biomarkers for prognostic value in men treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT).
METHODS: The Fluidigm® PCR array was used for multi-transcript profiling of laser microdissected tumours from archival formalin-fixed diagnostic biopsies of patients treated by EBRT or PADT. Cases were matched for disease characteristics and had known 5 year biochemical relapse outcomes (n = 60). Results were validated by immunohistochemistry in a custom needle biopsy tissue microarray. Six biomarkers previously tested only in surgical cohorts were analysed (PTEN, E-Cadherin, EGFR, EZH2, PSMA, MSMB). Transcript and protein expression was correlated with clinical outcome analysed using Kruskal Wallis, Fisher's test and Cox proportional hazard model.
RESULTS: Altered expression of E-Cadherin (p = 0.008) was associated with early relapse after EBRT. In PADT treated men however only altered MSMB transcript was prognostic for early relapse (p = 0.001). The remaining biomarkers however did not demonstrate prognostic ability in either cohort. In a separate tissue array we validated altered E-Cadherin protein as a predictor of early relapse after EBRT (n = 47) (HR 0.34, CI p = 0.02) but not in PADT treated men (n = 63).
CONCLUSION: We demonstrate proof of principle of multiple transcript profiling in archival diagnostic biopsies of non-surgically treated men for biomarker discovery. We identify a role for E-Cadherin as a novel biomarker of early relapse following EBRT.

Kerr M, Scott HE, Groselj B, et al.
Deoxycytidine kinase expression underpins response to gemcitabine in bladder cancer.
Clin Cancer Res. 2014; 20(21):5435-45 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
PURPOSE: In a recent phase II clinical trial, low-dose (100 mg/m(2)) gemcitabine showed promise as a radiosensitizer in bladder cancer, but underlying mechanisms lack elucidation. Here, we investigated the mechanism of radiosensitization by low-dose gemcitabine in bladder cancer cell lines.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Four bladder cancer cell lines were screened for radiosensitization by low-dose gemcitabine using clonogenic assay, and gemcitabine-resistant RT112gem and CALgem cells created by exposure to increasing gemcitabine doses. Four key gemcitabine-regulatory genes were knocked down by transient siRNA. Nude mice carrying CALgem subcutaneous xenografts were exposed to 100 mg/kg gemcitabine ± ionizing radiation (IR) and response assessed by tumor growth delay.
RESULTS: Gemcitabine was cytotoxic in the low nanomolar range (10-40 nmol/L) in four bladder cancer cell lines and radiosensitized all four lines. Sensitizer enhancement ratios at 10% survival were: RT112 1.42, CAL29 1.55, T24 1.63, and VMCUB1 1.47. Transient siRNA knockdown of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) significantly reduced radiosensitization by gemcitabine (P = 0.02). RT112gem and CALgem cells displayed robust decreases of dCK mRNA and protein levels; reexpression of dCK restored gemcitabine sensitivity. However, CALgem xenografts responded better to combination gemcitabine/IR than either treatment alone (P < 0.001) with dCK strongly expressed in the tumor vasculature and stroma.
CONCLUSIONS: Gemcitabine resistance in bladder cancer cell lines was associated with decreased dCK expression, but gemcitabine-resistant xenografts were responsive to combination low-dose gemcitabine/IR. We propose that dCK activity in tumor vasculature renders it gemcitabine sensitive, which is sufficient to invoke a tumor response and permit tumor cell kill in gemcitabine-resistant tumors.

Prick J, de Haan G, Green AR, Kent DG
Clonal heterogeneity as a driver of disease variability in the evolution of myeloproliferative neoplasms.
Exp Hematol. 2014; 42(10):841-51 [PubMed] Related Publications
Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematological diseases in which cells of the myelo-erythroid lineage are overproduced and patients are predisposed to leukemic transformation. Hematopoietic stem cells are the suspected disease-initiating cells, and these cells must acquire a clonal advantage relative to nonmutant hematopoietic stem cells to perpetuate disease. In 2005, several groups identified a single gain-of-function point mutation in JAK2 that associated with the majority of MPNs, and subsequent studies have led to a comprehensive understanding of the mutational landscape in MPNs. However, confusion still exists as to how a single genetic aberration can be associated with multiple distinct disease entities. Many explanations have been proposed, including JAK2V617F homozygosity, individual patient heterogeneity, and the differential regulation of downstream JAK2 signaling pathways. Several groups have made knock-in mouse models expressing JAK2V617F and have observed divergent phenotypes, each recapitulating some aspects of disease. Intriguingly, most of these models do not observe a strong hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal advantage compared with wild-type littermate controls, raising the question of how a clonal advantage is established in patients with MPNs. This review summarizes the current molecular understanding of MPNs and the diversity of disease phenotypes and proposes that the increased proliferation induced by JAK2V617F applies a selection pressure on the mutant clone that results in highly diverse clonal evolution in individuals.

Venderbosch S, Nagtegaal ID, Maughan TS, et al.
Mismatch repair status and BRAF mutation status in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a pooled analysis of the CAIRO, CAIRO2, COIN, and FOCUS studies.
Clin Cancer Res. 2014; 20(20):5322-30 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence and prognostic value of mismatch repair (MMR) status and its relation to BRAF mutation (BRAF(MT)) status in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A pooled analysis of four phase III studies in first-line treatment of mCRC (CAIRO, CAIRO2, COIN, and FOCUS) was performed. Primary outcome parameter was the hazard ratio (HR) for median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in relation to MMR and BRAF. For the pooled analysis, Cox regression analysis was performed on individual patient data.
RESULTS: The primary tumors of 3,063 patients were analyzed, of which 153 (5.0%) exhibited deficient MMR (dMMR) and 250 (8.2%) a BRAF(MT). BRAF(MT) was observed in 53 (34.6%) of patients with dMMR tumors compared with 197 (6.8%) of patients with proficient MMR (pMMR) tumors (P < 0.001). In the pooled dataset, median PFS and OS were significantly worse for patients with dMMR compared with pMMR tumors [HR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-1.57 and HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.61, respectively), and for patients with BRAF(MT) compared with BRAF wild-type (BRAF(WT)) tumors (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.17-1.54 and HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.66-2.19, respectively). PFS and OS were significantly decreased for patients with BRAF(MT) within the group of patients with pMMR, but not for BRAF status within dMMR, or MMR status within BRAF(WT) or BRAF(MT).
CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of dMMR and BRAF(MT) in patients with mCRC is low and both biomarkers confer an inferior prognosis. Our data suggest that the poor prognosis of dMMR is driven by the BRAF(MT) status.

Lezina L, Aksenova V, Ivanova T, et al.
KMTase Set7/9 is a critical regulator of E2F1 activity upon genotoxic stress.
Cell Death Differ. 2014; 21(12):1889-99 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
During the recent years lysine methyltransferase Set7/9 ((Su(var)-3-9, Enhancer-of-Zeste, Trithorax) domain containing protein 7/9) has emerged as an important regulator of different transcription factors. In this study, we report a novel function for Set7/9 as a critical co-activator of E2 promoter-binding factor 1 (E2F1)-dependent transcription in response to DNA damage. By means of various biochemical, cell biology, and bioinformatics approaches, we uncovered that cell-cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint of tumour cells upon DNA damage is defined by the threshold of expression of both E2F1 and Set7/9. The latter affects the activity of E2F1 by indirectly modulating histone modifications in the promoters of E2F1-dependent genes. Moreover, Set7/9 differentially affects E2F1 transcription targets: it promotes cell proliferation via expression of the CCNE1 gene and represses apoptosis by inhibiting the TP73 gene. Our biochemical screening of the panel of lung tumour cell lines suggests that these two factors are critically important for transcriptional upregulation of the CCNE1 gene product and hence successful progression through cell cycle. These findings identify Set7/9 as a potential biomarker in tumour cells with overexpressed E2F1 activity.

Kelly RS, Vineis P
Biomarkers of susceptibility to chemical carcinogens: the example of non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
Br Med Bull. 2014; 111(1):89-100 [PubMed] Related Publications
BACKGROUND: Genetic susceptibly to suspected chemical and environmental carcinogens may modify the response to exposure. The aim of this review was to explore the issues involved in the study of gene-environment interactions, and to consider the use of susceptibility biomarkers in cancer epidemiology, using non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) as an example.
SOURCES OF DATA: PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for peer-reviewed articles considering biomarkers of susceptibility to chemical, agricultural and industrial carcinogens in the aetiology of NHL.
AREAS OF AGREEMENT: The results suggest a modifying role for genetic susceptibility to a number of occupational and environmental exposures including organochlorines, chlorinated solvents, chlordanes and benzene in the aetiology of NHL. The potential importance of these gene-environment interactions in NHL may help to explain the lack of definitive carcinogens identified to date for this malignancy.
AREAS OF CONTROVERSY: Although a large number of genetic variants and gene-environment interactions have been explored for NHL, to date replication is lacking and therefore the findings remain to be validated.
GROWING POINTS AND AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH: These findings highlight the need for novel standardized methodologies in the study of genetic susceptibility to chemical carcinogens.

Abraham AG, O'Neill E
PI3K/Akt-mediated regulation of p53 in cancer.
Biochem Soc Trans. 2014; 42(4):798-803 [PubMed] Related Publications
Mutations activating the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway and inactivating the TP53 tumour-suppressor gene are common mechanisms that cancer cells require to proliferate and escape pre-programmed cell death. In a well-described mechanism, Akt mediates negative control of p53 levels through enhancing MDM2 (murine double minute 2)-mediated targeting of p53 for degradation. Accumulating evidence is beginning to suggest that, in certain circumstances, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10)/PI3K/Akt also promotes p53 translation and protein stability, suggesting that additional mechanisms may be involved in the Akt-mediated regulation of p53 in tumours. In the present article, we discuss these aspects in the light of clinical PI3K/Akt inhibitors, where information regarding the effect on p53 activity will be a crucial factor that will undoubtedly influence therapeutic efficacy.

Shin MR, Lee HJ, Kang SK, et al.
Isocudraxanthone K induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in oral cancer cells via hypoxia inducible factor-1α.
Biomed Res Int. 2014; 2014:934691 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
Isocudraxanthone K (IK) is a novel, natural compound from a methanol extract of the root bark of Cudrania tricuspidata. It has not been shown previously that IK possessed antitumor activity. We investigated the antitumor effects and molecular mechanism of IK and related signal transduction pathway(s) in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCCCs). The MTT assay revealed that IK had an antiproliferative effect on OSCCCs, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IK induced apoptosis in OSCCCs, as identified by a cell-cycle analysis, annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining, and the nuclear morphology in cell death. IK caused time-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, p38, and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase). In addition, IK increased the cytosolic to nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and the degradation and phosphorylation of IκB-α in HN4 and HN12 cells. Furthermore, IK treatment downregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a HIF-1α activator, attenuated the IK-induced growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects, and blocked IK-induced expression of apoptosis regulatory proteins, such as Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and cytochrome c. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence of antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of IK as a HIF-1α inhibitor and suggest it may be a drug candidate for chemotherapy against oral cancer.

Benner A, Mansouri L, Rossi D, et al.
MDM2 promotor polymorphism and disease characteristics in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: results of an individual patient data-based meta-analysis.
Haematologica. 2014; 99(8):1285-91 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/12/2015 Related Publications
A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with disease predisposition in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the MDM2 promotor region, MDM2SNP309, was shown to soothe the p53 pathway. In the current study, we aimed to clarify the effect of the MDM2SNP309 on chronic lymphocytic leukemia characteristics and outcome. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 2598 individual patients from 10 different cohorts. Patients' data and genetic analysis for MDM2SNP309 genotype, immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutation status and fluorescence in situ hybridization results were collected. There were no differences in overall survival based on the polymorphism (log rank test, stratified by study cohort; P=0.76; GG genotype: cohort-adjusted median overall survival of 151 months; TG: 153 months; TT: 149 months). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, advanced age, male sex and unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes were associated with inferior survival, but not the MDM2 genotype. The MDM2SNP309 is unlikely to influence disease characteristics and prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Studies investigating the impact of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms on prognosis are often controversial. This may be due to selection bias and small sample size. A meta-analysis based on individual patient data provides a reasonable strategy for prognostic factor analyses in the case of small individual studies. Individual patient data-based meta-analysis can, therefore, be a powerful tool to assess genetic risk factors in the absence of large studies.

Tahata S, Yuan B, Kikuchi H, et al.
Cytotoxic effects of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate in small-cell lung cancer cells, alone and in combination with cisplatin.
Int J Oncol. 2014; 45(4):1749-59 [PubMed] Related Publications
The cytocidal effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) was investigated by focusing on cell viability, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines (NCI-H196 and NCI-H889). PDTC exhibited a much stronger dose-dependent cytotoxic activity against NCI-H196 compared to NCI-H889, while no such activity was observed in normal human embryonal lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. Cell cycle arrest in S phase paralleled with suppression of c-myc expression without accompanying DNA fragmentation was observed in NCI-H196 cells. A transient increase in the intracellular ROS accompanied with an alteration of expression of oxidative stress-related genes was also confirmed in NCI-H196 cells. Furthermore, the addition of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a free radical scavenger, not only abolished PDTC-trigger alterations of expression of these oxidative-related genes, but also almost completely abrogated PDTC-induced reduction in cell viability and morphological changes associated with cell damage. These results thus suggest that PDTC-induced cytotoxicity is attributed to its pro-oxidant activity. PDTC-induced cytotoxicity was further enhanced by CuCl2, however, abolished by bathocuproine disulfonate (BCPS), a non-permeable copper-specific chelator, supporting the plausibility that accumulation of intracellular Cu plays an important role in the cytotoxicity. Importantly, we demonstrated for the first time that PDTC downregulated the expression of ATP7A, known to be responsible for Cu efflux, but did not affect the expression of CTR1, known as a copper uptake transporter. Intriguingly, combination of much lower dose of cisplatin (5 µM) and non-toxic dose of PDTC (0.1 µM) synergistically induced a significant cytotoxicity in NCI-H196 cells. Given that ATP7A plays a critical role in the resistance of platinum-drug (such as cisplatin) representing a first-line treatment for SCLC, PDTC could be a promising candidate of adjunct therapeutic reagent for the patients requiring treatment with platinum-based regimens.

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